Thinking Fast And Thinking Slow After An Earthquake

If you haven’t read Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow, I highly recommend it.

Fast thinking is what we do because of biases and animal thinking.

Slow thinking is what we do when we work logically through a problem.

Fast thinking after an earthquake is rushing out of your building and exposing yourself to the risk of falling masonry and glass.

Slow thinking after an earthquake is getting under your desk and staying put while you assess what sort of damage exists along your typical route home.

The arrogance of heritage building owners is appalling. Stephen Franks and Eric Crampton have written well on this issue, but I have to throw my hat in the ring – 20 years to strengthen buildings and no hard rules around historical facade integrity simply are not good enough.

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